Kimberly Hock

Kimberly HockKim had her gastric bypass surgery in August 2004. Today, she may be 160 pounds lighter, but her makeover actually began not with her diminishing waistline, but the day she decided to have the surgery.

Kim is originally from Pittsburgh. She was the first woman to go to college in her family and says that she wanted the best from life. She had always been overweight and realized at certain points in her life that this was holding her back from many things that she wanted to accomplish. Coming from a family of large individuals, she thought that her weight problem was partly genetic and whatever she tried did not work.

The 42-year-old chief audit executive says that it was her friend's success story with her surgery that made her curious at first. Long before her phone conversation with her friend, she had considered other options such as liposuction and cosmetic surgeries, but realized that was not the answer to the situation. She had also tried cardio training numerous times but her knees hurt and she was in constant pain. "I couldn't even walk around for more than a couple of minutes." Kim recalled. She went to Disney World with some colleagues on a business trip and had to use a scooter to get around the park. "It was a turning point in my life. The embarrassment I felt that day made me realize I had to do something about my weight and I had to do it fast."

Kim described how the added weight was contributing to feelings of depression and self-conscious. "We would go to a restaurant, and I would pick the table in the furthest corner," she said. "I couldn't fit in a booth and didn't want to have to answer the questions associated with this, so I would just ask for the table before anyone could interject."

She finally talked to her friend about the surgery, went online and found Dr. Joseph Afram's Web site. " Dr. Afram had performed more than 2000 gastric bypass surgeries at that time. I read about his expertise and his success rate, and I knew that he was the right surgeon for me."

Today, Kim is more positive and enthusiastic about life. It's very different for her now. "I had a realistic goal to see my 12-year-old son, Eric, grow up to become a man and a hope to take care of my grandchildren." She said. "With the surgery, I will get the chance to experience this. I would have the surgery done again in a heart beat with Dr. Afram!"

Kim had always been independent in the past, but she had limited herself to what she could do. Now she looks great, she's healthy, and she can walk, talk, shop and live life with a sense of confidence that she never had before. She started her new life with a new body, a new job and a new attitude. "Finally, I feel like there is a whole world in front of me," she said.

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